Ashley Robinson at Alexandra Headland Surf Club.  Photo: John McCutcheon / Sunshine Coast Daily
Ashley Robinson at Alexandra Headland Surf Club. Photo: John McCutcheon / Sunshine Coast Daily John McCutcheon

Clubs could revisit dress policy over sexist complaints

THE CEO of a popular Coast surf club has come out in support of another club's dress code policy change, amid concerns differing rules for men and women could be seen as discriminatory.

This week Coolum Surf Club announced it would allow both men and women to wear singlets at all times inside the pub, hats too.

 

Ben Hammond enjoys a beer at the Coolum Surf Club wearing his singlet and thongs.
Ben Hammond enjoys a beer at the Coolum Surf Club wearing his singlet and thongs. Warren Lynam

The decision followed an email sent out by Clubs Queensland advising clubs to revisit their dress codes to avoid having to pay damages from discrimination complaints.

The club's previous dress policy meant it would not serve men in singlets and as a result the venue received several complaints of discrimination.

Would you want your local surf club to relax its dress code for men?

This poll ended on 20 April 2018.

Current Results

Yes, it's discriminatory to have different rules for men and women.

50%

No, the dress codes keep the clubs classy.

38%

I don't care either way.

10%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Alexandra Headland Surf Club CEO Ashley Robinson said the club had also received discrimination complaints; currently everyone can wear singlets downstairs at the Bluff Bar however men would be offered a shirt to dine upstairs.

Mr Robinson said at the next meeting he would put it to the club's member committee to revisit their own dress code policy.

"This is a member's club and therefore it is their house and ultimately, their decision," Mr Robinson said.

"But I wouldn't disagree to a change in the policy.

"We have had patrons who have complained about the dress code being discriminatory.

"But I think this is more about common sense - people can wear a $10 shirt from Woolies and be allowed into clubs but be unable to wear a $50 Billabong singlet.

"I believe if you look neat and tidy, even in a singlet, you should be allowed in. It's just about being respectful."

A Clubs Queensland newsletter stated it was lawful for clubs to set dress standards for people seeking to enter their facilities but imposing differing standards for men and women was not. However no club had been 'taken to task' for it.

Several clubs across the Coast were contacted for comment about their own dress code policies.



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