Cane and able thanks to Coffs Guide Dog

ERIC Jones would be lost without his white cane.

The 74-year-old retired electrician, who has lived in Coffs Harbour for 20 years, has been short sighted since he was born, but it's only in the last four years that his eyesight has deteriorated to the point where he can only distinguish colours and shapes.

And while he's not completely blind, Eric's life would be a lot harder if it wasn't for his Guide Dogs white cane.

“People are much more considerate when they see the white cane,” Eric said. “When I'm out, it makes a big difference getting around and people tend to offer you help more as well.

“I couldn't go out on my own without it.”

Eric is one of more than 100,000 people in NSW and the ACT living with impaired vision who have become more mobile and independent thanks to the white cane that Guide Dogs provide free of charge.

Guide Dogs.

Today is International White Cane Day, a day set aside to remind sighted people of the need to show simple courtesy and common sense when approaching someone with a white cane.

Guide Dogs client services manager, John Black, said the white cane is an invaluable and underestimated tool.



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