Speed vans increase

TRAFFIC cameras are netting the State Government around $22- million a year, money the NRMA insists should be used to fix highway blackspots, put more highway patrol cars on roads and better educate drivers.

After switching off 38 “cash cow” cameras, found to be more about revenue than road safety, the O’Farrell Government has confirmed the number of mobile speed vans will increase on NSW roads from six to 40.

In addition, a further 27 new cameras installed by the RTA in April could also soon come online to add to State coffers.

Despite promises from Roads Minister Duncan Gay that speed cameras will only be used to save lives on problem stretches, NRMA president Wendy Machin is petitioning for the Government to sink traffic fine revenue back into roads.

“We need to collect 10,000 signatures so that the issue of directly linking speed camera revenue to road safety funding – known as hypothecation – is debated in Parliament,” Ms Machin said in Coffs Harbour yesterday.

Ms Machin’s three-day road trip on the North Coast winds up in Tweed Heads today and once again a special focus of the tour has been the Pacific Highway, along with more localised roads in need of repair.

She said the NRMA would staunchly hold the State and Federal governments accountable to the 2016 deadline for completion of the Pacific Highway duplication.



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