Budget won't help everyone

LABOR'S first budget in more than a decade has been hailed a boon for Aussie families, but for one Coffs Coast family this year's budget offers little hope of change.

Glen and Kylie Carter have eight children and their life together centres on providing the best for their brood.

Unfortunately for them, this equates to a grocery bill of more than $500 a week and a budget stricter than the federal government's.

"When you've got a tribe, you've got to buy big," Glen said.

"We do what we can to make sure the kids never go without, but with the price of petrol now, groceries, and everyday items, it's a struggle."

Kylie said the cost of living is the family's biggest concern.

"It's ridiculous how much things cost now and you pay it because you have to have fuel in your car, you have to feed your children," she said.

"But they don't say anything about making it cheaper to live in the budget."

While the Carters welcomed the announcement of tax cuts, the effect on their family will be minimal.

"A couple of little increases, a few extra dollars, but between what you get and what you pay, it doesn't really compensate," Glen said.

One area that will significantly benefit the family is education, with the budget setting aside $4.4 billion to refund 50 per cent of education expenses back in the parents' pockets.

"You have to pay for education and, unless you do, your kid gets half an education, and that gets them nowhere," Glen said.

"Money for that is a good idea."


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