GREATEST GIFT: One Fiji child uses the Lifestraw filter shipped to their village by Buderim Rotary.
GREATEST GIFT: One Fiji child uses the Lifestraw filter shipped to their village by Buderim Rotary. Contributed

Buderim rotary presents gift of life to Fijian villages

MORE children die every year from waterborne diseases than are killed in war.

That was the fact which shocked the Rotary Club of Buderim into action and prompted their Lifestraw clean water program to see 28 clean water filters installed in Fijian villages.

Rotarian Lloyd Edwards said the club had paired with a handful of other Rotary clubs in the Pacific Islands, including the Rotary Suva East Fiji, to deliver the units.

"It's a fundamentally sophisticated filter which removes particles carrying diseases and impurities,” he said.

"Basically, you just pour dirty water into the top and clean water comes out the bottom.

"A lot of kids are going to school drinking the water from the creek, and a gut illness that would be a bit inconvenient for us could be deadly for them.

"We've seen it as a great product and one way we can help developing countries, particularly children, and getting clean water to them was a very important issue for us.”

Mr Edwards said the program's successful integration into these Fijian communities had caused the Buderim club to keep dreaming big.

"We're proven that it works now, so we'll expand (the program) in Fiji this year and will be looking around the Pacific Islands, like the Solomons and Papua New Guinea,” he said.

He explained since the clubs were run by volunteers, donors could be assured their money was being put directly into action.

"For every dollar raised, about 96 or 97 cents is used for the program,” Mr Edwards said.

"It's a great way we can help disadvantaged kids in need and, again, you know when you hand over your hard-earned cash that it's going to the right sources.”

The long-time Rotarian also said it was heartening to know the clubs were able to create a tangible difference in the lives of people less fortunate.

"It's a great feeling of goodwill,” he said.

"We're not, dare I say, necessarily young enough to fly over there in emergency situations and work on the ground but, this way, you can feel good about the community involvement that we do.”

For more information, Rotary Club of Buderim via secretary@buderimrotary.org.



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