Banning single use plastic bags is a step in the right direction, but it is a long way from fixing the issues of pollution in our oceans.

Of course, the green groups are rejoicing the ban as a major win against pollution, but if they actually got out on the water they'd realised they couldn't be further from the truth.

You don't have to go far. If you want to see where the real issue is just go down to your local creek.

Plastic cups and containers made up most of the rubbish at Al’s local creek. Picture: Al McGlashan
Plastic cups and containers made up most of the rubbish at Al’s local creek. Picture: Al McGlashan

I did just that the other day, taking the dogs for a walk I headed to my nearest creek in suburban Sydney.

Clambering in through the mangrove forest I was quickly surrounded by plastic pollution.

There weren't many single use plastic shopping bags, but there were endless drink bottles and food packaging, as well polystyrene, and endless disposable coffee cups.

This creek flows straight into the Parramatta River and ultimately into the ocean.

It's a sad fact that all our drains from roads, carparks and pathways spill straight into our ­waterways - so much for a first-world country. I guess out of sight, out of mind!

Take a coffee mug with you as disposable coffee cups are a major source of pollution these days and hard to recycle. Picture: Al McGlashan
Take a coffee mug with you as disposable coffee cups are a major source of pollution these days and hard to recycle. Picture: Al McGlashan

Banning plastic bags is a start, but let's face it, it's a Band-Aid fix to appease the inner-city greens and their guilt for living in the most changed environment on earth.

The real issue is swept under the carpet, or more appropriately, down the drain, right underneath them.

Urban run-off is an ugly truth and a massive issue in all urban areas, but especially Sydney with its population explosion.

This is what we want: beautiful clean water. Funnily enough clean water means more fish. Picture: Al McGlashan
This is what we want: beautiful clean water. Funnily enough clean water means more fish. Picture: Al McGlashan

Everything that ends up on the ground pretty much finds its way into our waterways after a bit of rain, and ultimately into our oceans, from rubbish to oils and chemicals.

There is a link here with our ill thought-out marine parks.

Anglers are locked out, many fishos are the only ones who clean up the rubbish in isolated areas. At the same time the proponents of lock outs ignore those dreaded stormwater drains pouring rubbish straight into the marine parks.

It really is frustrating because I want healthy waterways and yet I seem to be constantly fighting for common sense.

It's time we started focusing on the big ­issues and doing something that counts.

Looking after habitat by reducing litter is the first step to a healthy waterway and everyone needs to contribute. I carry my own drink bottle and coffee mug.

It's a small thing, but just imagine if everyone did it - now that would be a massive reduction in rubbish in coffee cups alone.

Al's Tips

1 Always leave your fishing spots better than you found them.

2 Complain to your local, state and federal members to get our waterways cleaned up.

3 Take your own coffee mug and reusable water bottle.

 

 



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