Hud and Mugsy 2008Linocut, watercolour and ink on paper60 x 90cmPurchased 2008
Hud and Mugsy 2008Linocut, watercolour and ink on paper60 x 90cmPurchased 2008 Rona Green

ARTEFACTS: Exploration of intimate cultural codes

From the Collection

Rona GREEN
Hud and Mugsy  2008
Linocut, watercolour and ink on paper
60 x 90cm
Purchased 2008

'Hud and Mugsy' by Rona Green is one of the most popular prints in our collection. It is hard to stop it being on display in exhibitions or in the various council buildings. Arguments for its safe keeping given it is a work on paper and therefore should only be on display for a maximum period of time in any two years do not always sway the exhibition staff. The gallery holds two prints of Rona's in its collection, the first, 'Slim', was acquired through the 2005 PCA's member print program while 'Hud and Mugsy' was purchased in 2008 from the Port Jackson Press, Melbourne.

Rona Green's fantastical figurative imagery explores ideas about identity. The artist uses the body as a vehicle to tell stories by means of transformative devices, particularly anthropomorphism and body decoration. The hybrid characters she creates are loners, misfits and outcasts who bear the marks and scars of past experience. Through them she champions idiosyncrasy and individuality.

Born and raised in the port city of Geelong, Australia, Rona went on to study art at La Trobe University in Bendigo and Victorian College of the Arts in Melbourne. This was followed by a Master of Fine Art degree in 2012 at Monash University.

Well known for striking pictures of peculiar creatures, Rona has received many accolades such as the Geelong Print Prize, Swan Hill Print Acquisitive Award and Silk Cut Award Grand Prize. In addition her work is represented in over fifty Australian and international public collections including the National Gallery of Australia. Her most recent exhibition was Chancing your arm at the Australian Galleries, Melbourne, this year.

Rona's interests in Egyptian art, historical figures, science fiction, B-grade movies, secret societies, tattooing traditions, subcultures and the animal kingdom contributes to her work. She lives in Melbourne, Australia.

 

 

Artefacts

Two exciting new exhibitions are on display at the Gallery, Woven Dreams by Bundjalung artist Kylie Caldwell and Crossing the Clarence.

In Woven Dreams, Bundjalung artist Kylie Caldwell uses allegory, metaphor and authentic imagery to explore intimate cultural codes reverberating around her, emphasising perseverance, evolvement and fortitude. The eclectic collection of woven works, thread themes willing openness and understanding to connect to femininity, humanity and our environments. Caldwell plays with vessels and sculptural shapes, inviting you to appreciate refined, tactile imagery reminiscent of traditional and contemporary socio-cultural experiences and encounters, her dreaming. 

Kylie Caldwell, Woven Dreams, 2019, Buchie rush (wetland reed). Courtesy of the artist.
Kylie Caldwell, Woven Dreams, 2019, Buchie rush (wetland reed). Courtesy of the artist. Kylie Caldwell

The fibre work of contemporary Aboriginal women reference past generations of weaving traditions in both overt and subtle ways.  Woven Dreams share the artists dream to weave, a cultural practice has been renewed through indirect and direct opportunities.  The collection of work celebrates revitalisation whilst bringing forth individual contemporary expression, unique creativity and artistry within the context of a rich cultural framework.

Crossing the Clarence celebrates the beauty and engineering excellence represented through major capital works over the Clarence River. This exhibition is the final instalment of the Grafton Regional Gallery's Bridges project.

In this exhibition artists have explored and documented the evolution of the Tabulam Bridge and its construction through the mediums of photography, sculpture and  painting. Each artist brings to life a new perspective into the development of this complex item of infrastructure. In the Northern Rivers region we have a fondness for bridges - they are an essential part of our everyday lives as we cross our natural waterways.

Bridges are not just major items of capital works they provide links for our community, and are engineering structures of architectural beauty that fascinate and inspire. They act as gateways for settings in books, television, films or as the subject for many artworks. Bridges don not just signify their location, or function, they span opposing sides of the mighty Clarence River to provide a meeting place for community.

Curt Edwards, Tabulam Bridges - 1899/2020, 2020, oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist.
Curt Edwards, Tabulam Bridges - 1899/2020, 2020, oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist. Curt Edwards

 

Opportunities

Call out for designs by Clarence Valley Artists

As part of the new Grafton Regional Gallery development there are a number of opportunities for local artist to develop designs that will be incorporated into a number of building elements within the Gallery precinct. We are inviting artists to register their interest. To find out more please email the Gallery at gallery@clarence.nsw.gov.au by July 29.  

Out and About

Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery: Be Still @ Emporium Bellingen

Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery in association with the Emporium Bellingen is delighted to share a snippet of our exhibition program with the Bellingen community.

The Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery invited the community to capture photos of their domestic experience living in COVID-19 isolation on the Coffs Coast and around the world, through the theme of still life. With the aid of Instagram, the community responded with photos of still life compositions by including one of the following hashtags #BeStillCoffsCoast, #BeStillAustralia or #BeStillWorld.

This collection of images has culminated in the Be Still exhibition across two locations, the Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery and Emporium Bellingen.



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