Members of the Kororo Primary School Year 3/4 girls division two team.
Members of the Kororo Primary School Year 3/4 girls division two team.

Slam dunk for Kororo kids



FOR a basketball club that had only 24 players last year, the growth to six teams at Kororo Primary School this year has paved the way for a successful season.

All six teams made their way to the grand final this year with both the boys and girls winning the Grade 3/4 sections.

In fact the girls final was between two Kororo teams with the Babes overcoming the Ice.

The boys team went through the season undefeated, comfortably winning most games they played.

The grand final against Bishop Druitt was a different story though.

With two minutes remaining, coach Erin O'Malley admitted that he was concerned as his team trailed by three points.

At this point, Julie Black who had a huge hand in creating the club's success, grabbed the other five teams involved on grand final day to get to the court and cheer the boys home.

The support made all the difference and Korora scored the last three baskets to win the grand final in the dying stages.

O'Malley said that through years of basketball and football in his sporting life, Kororo is one of, if not the best, clubs that he's been involved in.

"The camaraderie in the club is excellent and a lot of the parents in the area are really committed to the club," he said.

"Julie Black deserves the most credit though, she's the lady who got all the basketball teams together and she's been the one pulling all the strings."



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