Visiting students from Grafton High School get up close and personal with Sebastian the carpet python under the watchful eyes o
Visiting students from Grafton High School get up close and personal with Sebastian the carpet python under the watchful eyes o

Science up close

By ANN-MARIE MAY

EVER wondered what a python feels like to touch? What exactly is that mushy stuff between our ears and what does it do? How can someone lay on a bed of nails without hurting themselves (or can't they)?

All these questions and many more were answered for the 600 local students who took part in yesterday's Science In The Bush expo.

Held at the National Marine Science Centre, the program is designed to provide students with an opportunity to get involved in the science which surrounds them every day and to see the huge variety of career opportunities available in science, engineering, technology and innovation.

Primary school students were entranced by the 'Oobie Goobies and Creepy Crawlies' of the deep with Southern Cross University scientists and discovered the local environment with National Parks and Wildlife Service rangers taking them on a guided Interpretive Walk.

High School students from the region discovered the 'Creatures of the Benthos' and got hands on experience in researching the marine environment before being amazed by the wizardry of artificial intelligence in 'Smartbots Inc'.

Science in the Bush presenters come from a wide range of local and visiting organisations including Taronga Zoo, the Australian Museum, SCU, the National Marine Science Centre and the University of Newcastle. The National Marine Science Centre will open its doors to the public on Saturday from 10am to 2pm for its annual open day.



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