Hollie Atchison and Billie Bourke from Kororo Public School are keeping the worms well fed on a diet of leftover lunch scraps.
Hollie Atchison and Billie Bourke from Kororo Public School are keeping the worms well fed on a diet of leftover lunch scraps.

Kororo kids clean up

By KAT MULLARD

WHILE it's no news to parents that children and worms often go together, Kororo kids are bringing home a wormy message of a different kind.

Last year Kororo Public School launched it's Caring for Ourselves, Other's and Earth's Environment (COOEE) program, calling students into ecological action.

This year one of the highlights of the program is the school's very own worm farm, to help teach students about waste reduction.

"Each class has it's own worm bucket where the students put their lunch scraps. The class 'worm farmers' then empty the scraps into the worm farm. The end product is called 'Worm Wizz' and is available for sale to the public. It's a very good fertiliser for the garden," teacher Julie Nolan said.

The program is in response to the NSW Department of Education and Training's Environmental Management Plan (SEMP), and involves all students and teachers in the school.

"One of the biggest issues that is going to face these children will be environmental issues, and we are running this program to help them feel empowered and let them know that there are things they can do to help the environment," Ms Nolan said.

"The kids love things where they can be active and environmental education let's them do this. The students are responding very positively," teacher Di Coakes said.

Other environmental projects the students are working on include a dune care project where students have the responsibility of looking after sand dunes at Hills beach, and a Litter Free Lunch day, where children are asked to bring their lunch in reusable containers.

Ms Nolan said that the Litter Free Lunch days have considerably reduced the level of waste in the school bins, and she has even heard reports of students telling parents not to buy individually wrapped school treats.

"I've heard one parent say that they're not allowed to buy little packets of chips anymore. The Litter Free Lunch days also have a fresh food focus, promoting healthy eating. Students are really bringing the message home," Ms Nolan said.



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