Scott Dillon of the Surf Legends Museum had a slithering visitor on Wednesday.
Scott Dillon of the Surf Legends Museum had a slithering visitor on Wednesday.

Hang five, this fan had Scott on his toes



IF this stripey guy was after a nocturnal surf, he was in the right place for a board.

The snake was seen slithering across the floor of the Legends Surf Museum on Wednesday by owner Scott Dillon, who first thought it was a poisonous coral sea snake, like the ones he has seen in Indonesia.

"It was about 36 degrees and it was probably looking for a cool place," Scott said.

"We had a few people around and it was a bit of a shock."

A quick search on the internet showed it was in fact a bandy-bandy snake, which is found in eastern and southern Australia.

The bandy-bandy is identifiable by its distinctive pattern, comprised of about 30 blue-black to dark brown rings, with narrower white in between, running completely around the surface of the snake.

A nocturnal snake, often found under logs and rocks, it also burrows under the ground and disappears, as the one found at the museum did when it was released outside.

While the bandy-bandy is venomous, it is not considered to be dangerous to humans.

Many snakes are now coming out of their hibernation now that the weather has become warmer.



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