WORKING for Tweed?s Aboriginal youth Bec Couch, Russell
WORKING for Tweed?s Aboriginal youth Bec Couch, Russell

Consultation helping youth



TWEED police and members of local Indigenous groups have joined forces to break down barriers and improve the lives of our community's Aboriginal youth.

The Local Area Command Aboriginal Consultative Committee (LACACC) is starting to make major inroads since its inception three years ago.

LACACC was established to develop programs, to be a voice for local Aboriginals and monitor the implementation of the Aboriginal Strategic Direction, a portfolio initiative after the Death in Custody inquiries of 1995.

"The committee helps us solve problems that may not have previously been solved," Acting Inspector Brett Greentree said.

"It assists us in breaking down barriers and promotes positive awareness of Aboriginal issues."

Aboriginal liaison officer Beck Couch said she became involved with LACACC because it dealt with teenagers, and that's where her heart was.

A mother of teenage children herself, Ms Couch said if she could get one child to improve their life then every minute of her work on the committee was worth it.

Aboriginal Land Council chairperson Russell Logan said the committee helps give Aboriginal youths a reason for life.

"The programs give them something positive and meaningful to look forward to each day," he said.

Please contact LACACC through Tweed Heads Police if you wish to be involved.



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