The powerful bird had killed two hens before it was attacked by a goose.
The powerful bird had killed two hens before it was attacked by a goose.

Angry goose attacks Australia’s largest eagle

A YOUNG wedge-tailed eagle has bitten off more than he could chew after he got into a scuffle with an angry goose.

The 3kg bird was taken to Currumbin Wildlife Hospital nearly two weeks ago after it had attacked chickens at a Pumpenbil property in northern NSW.

The powerful bird had killed two hens before it was attacked by a goose.

Goose the wedge tailed eagle was attacked by a goose on a northern NSW property after it killed two chickens. Photo by Richard Gosling
Goose the wedge tailed eagle was attacked by a goose on a northern NSW property after it killed two chickens. Photo by Richard Gosling
Goose was checked on the weekend. Photo by Richard Gosling
Goose was checked on the weekend. Photo by Richard Gosling

Veterinarian Dr Andrew Hill said the eagle, aptly named Goose, had bruised eyebrows, a sore right wrist (on its wing) and trauma inside his right eye.

"Presumably the goose gave him a really good hiding," he said.

Photo of Michael Pyne checking the bird for injuries today at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital. Photo by Richard Gosling
Photo of Michael Pyne checking the bird for injuries today at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital. Photo by Richard Gosling

"It's not clear if he tried to get an easy feed and the goose came in to defend the chickens, or if he was already sick. When he came in he was lethargic and his appetite was poor."

Wedge-tailed eagles tend to be scavengers, he said.

Because eagles are highly visual predators, the injury to Goose's eye needs to be fully healed before he can be released.

Goose the wedge tailed eagle. Photo by Richard Gosling
Goose the wedge tailed eagle. Photo by Richard Gosling

Goose is expected to stay at the hospital in a large aviary where he can practise flying for about another month during his recovery.

Once better, Goose will be released in the area he was found, but not too close to the property where he was found.

Dr Michael Pyne checking the bird for injuries today at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital. Photo by Richard Gosling
Dr Michael Pyne checking the bird for injuries today at Currumbin Wildlife Hospital. Photo by Richard Gosling


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