Cooper's Celebration Ale a journeyman effort

WHEN one reaches a certain age it is only natural that one begins to forget a few things. Where one has left one's spectacles, for example, or, in my case, just how different a winter can be on the southern Darling Downs.

Yes, my brother and I had cause to visit our mother in the old home town of Warwick last weekend and it was slightly fresher than either of us experienced at our respective places of residence.

Fresher at about -2C as a matter of fact, a fact that became increasingly apparent as I jumped out of the car to get us something pleasant to ward off the chill of evening.

In truth, I should have got the hint when the bloke behind the counter was wearing clothing not dissimilar to that worn by Douglas Mawson in the Antarctic as depicted on the Australian $100 note.

Needless to say, despite being parked in the "browsing" lane of the bottle shop, as the breeze sailed through I was not particularly interested in reading a heap of labels to find something extra special.

So it came to pass that we settled into a couple of Thomas Cooper's Selection Celebration Ales.

I have always been rather partial to a Cooper's, from day dot they have produced beers in South Australia that are identifiably different to the run-of-the-mill ales and lagers produced on the east Coast, and this one is no different.

The Celebration in the title refers to the 150th year of beer production by the brewery. It wouldn't be out of place at a fiftieth birthday bash or similar.

It has a reddish tint in the glass and you get a lovely malty aroma on the nose. When poured it gets that cloudiness common to most Cooper's beers, although it is by no means pronounced.

How did it taste? Well okay…nothing to complain about but then again nothing to particularly write home about either. It was refreshing but not overly complex - I suppose you would call it a journeyman effort.

One to try when you want something a bit special but don't want to go overboard.

PS - thanks to the readers who sent best wishes to Hugh the Neighbour after his new hip - he is up and about and going well.

myshout@apn.com.au



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