JUST KEEP SWIMMING: Centre staff said Frankie, a green turtle, enjoys a good back scratch from volunteers and visitors alike.
JUST KEEP SWIMMING: Centre staff said Frankie, a green turtle, enjoys a good back scratch from volunteers and visitors alike. Julia Bartrim

A new procedure is saving more turtles

THE majority of turtles that come into care at the Quoin Island Turtle Rehabilitation Centre have infections and gas build-up.

Until recently the centre was able to release about 70 per cent of all turtles taken into care.

With the addition of a new procedure, which involves putting the injured turtle on a drip as soon as it arrives at the centre, release rates have spiked to about 90 per cent.

Currently the centre is caring for seven green turtles, the most common species found in the Gladstone region.

One of them, given the name Frankie, is in good physical health but has suspected brain damage.

He can dive but chooses not to, making him a sitting duck for boat strikes.

For this reason he cannot be released.

Manager at the centre Richard Gilmour said last week the centre had all four species of locally occurring turtles in care - the green, hawksbill, loggerhead and flatback

All except the green are endangered or critically endangered.

"It's very rare and very special to have (all species) in care at one time," Richard said.

"We released a hawskbill in Yeppoon about a week ago."

To find out more about the centre, go to the Facebook page: Quoin Island Turtle Rehabilitation Centre.



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