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Speed limit dropped to popular coastal town due to safety

A SPEED limit change will be introduced on Red Rock Rd at Corindi Beach to Red Rock in the next fortnight, weather permitting.

Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) has carried out a review as part of the NSW audit of speed zones.

"The review assessed a number of factors including road environment, traffic characteristics and crash data," Clarence MP Chris Gulaptis said.

"The existing 100km/h speed limit will be reduced to 90km/h from 400 metres north of James Runner Dr at Corindi Beach to 250 metres south of Rudder St at Red Rock.

"The change will improve road safety and better reflect road conditions appropriate for nearby rural developments."

Warning signs will be in place to advise motorists of the change and will remain for at least a week after the new speed limit signs have been installed.

Members of the community can sign up at the Safer Roads NSW website to receive updates about changes to permanent speed limits in their nominated area and have their say on speed limits.

For more information visit www.rms.nsw.gov.au.

Topics:  speed limit



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