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Restrictions proposed for 'cash cow' mobile speed cameras

State Labor has called for speed limits to be signposted on warning signs alerting drivers that there is a mobile speed camera ahead.
State Labor has called for speed limits to be signposted on warning signs alerting drivers that there is a mobile speed camera ahead.

CONCERNS that mobile speed cameras are being used as a revenue stream by the State Government have prompted the New South Wales Opposition to call for change.

State Labor's spokesman for roads, Walt Secord has proposed legislation calling for laws to see speed limits signposted near mobile speed cameras to alert oncoming drivers.

Do you think mobile speed cameras are making the roads safer?

Mr Secord's motion in the NSW Legislative Council comes after reports in July found motorists paid a record $149.3million in speeding and red light camera offences in 2013/14.

The mobile speed camera fines paid to the Office of State Revenue is now five times higher than it was at the end of 2013 - $1,176,333 in June, 2014 up from $217,924 in November, 2013.

"This is about changing behaviour and getting motorists to slow down rather than simply fining them," Mr Secord said.

"It is also in response to the rapid expansion of the hours of operation of the mobile speed camera units across New South Wales and complaints about the lack of signage.

State Labor wants speed limits to be posted on signs warning motorists there is a mobile speed camera ahead.
State Labor wants speed limits to be posted on signs warning motorists there is a mobile speed camera ahead.

"The new laws will bring mobile cameras into line with existing signage for fixed speed cameras. Fixed speed cameras have the speed limit posted three times near the devices."

He said in December, 2013 the State Liberal-National Government expanded its 45 mobile speed camera program from 900 hours a month to 7,000 hours a month.

The Opposition says the 45 government contracted mobile speed camera units are in addition to the 200 extra fixed cameras, the Baird Government is expanding across the State by December, 2015.

Currently, privately contracted mobile speed cameras have two requirements:

  • The vehicle must be overt and marked;
  • Operators must place three warning signs - 50 metres before and after the vehicle and one 250 metres before the vehicle.

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