Dining boom set to replace mining boom as key driver

Cancun, Quintana Roo. 7 de diciembre de 2010- Activistas y campesinos que participan en la marcha de organizaciones contra los acuerdos que se toman en la COP16 en el hotel Moon Palace.
Cancun, Quintana Roo. 7 de diciembre de 2010- Activistas y campesinos que participan en la marcha de organizaciones contra los acuerdos que se toman en la COP16 en el hotel Moon Palace. Moyses Zuniga Santiago.

TWO events this week mark sharply diverging paths for national and global food systems.

Wednesday (April 17) marked the 17th anniversary of the murder of 19 peasant family farmers in the Brazilian town of Dorado dos Carajas. Members of the million-strong Landless Workers Movement (MST), they were targeted as part of a campaign of intimidation and harassment by big landowners and agribusiness interests, for whom the MST's demands for more equitable access to land and other resources could not be tolerated.

The global small farmers movement La Via Campesina now commemorates April 17 as the International Day of Peasants' Struggle.

Each year hundreds of peasant farmers in many differ- ent countries lose their lives attempting to resist what appears to be a relentless push for greater corporate ownership and control over land, seeds, water and markets.

Thousands more lose their livelihoods and their land as they are forced off their own ancestral lands, often violently, to make way for biofuel plantations and the GM soy mega monocultures that provide feed for the factory farming of pigs and chickens.

All of this is supposedly done in the name of development, progress and efficiency.

Meanwhile, in Melbourne on Thursday (April 18), The Australian and the Wall Street Journal launched the inaugural Global Food Forum. As reported in the Australian, "billionaire packaging and recycling magnate Anthony Pratt" called for a "coalition of the willing" so that Australia can "quadruple our exports to feed 200 million people".

The dining boom will replace the mining boom as the next driver of our economy, apparently. Eyes lit up with estimates of an "additional $1.7 trillion in agriculture revenues between now and 2050 if (Australia) seized the opportunity of the Asia food boom".

Among other measures, this dining boom is said to depend on the so-called northern food bowl: clearing large swathes of northern Australia and irrigating it with dozens of new dams.

But, as Prof Andrew Campbell of Charles Darwin University has pointed out, water is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for successful food production. Good soils are essential, and in our north the soils are "low in nutrients and organic matter, they can't hold much water, they erode easily and they have low infiltration rates". Other obstacles to the rosy future of being Asia's food bowl include extreme monsoonal weather events, high input costs and higher labour costs due to remote locations.

Which brings us back to Via Campesina. They're campaigning for a food system that's fair and sustainable, one that works for people and the land, not simply for shareholders and CEOs.

In June, Via Campesina will hold its sixth international conference, in Jakarta. For the first time, a delegation of four Australian farmers are hoping to join the other delegates from dozens of countries around the world, to discuss the future of family farming and food systems worldwide.

They're asking for support from the Australian public to get there, to make sure the voices of Australian family farmers are heard in these important discussions. Go to pozible.com/project/20941.

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